Everret Maxine’s story is one of heartache, but it isn’t one of defeat. Everret is using the struggles and hurdles of her life to walk alongside others who are facing their own pain and hurt. Today we’ll hear how her life of loss has helped her to become an agent of healing. She believes that being a survivor carries responsibility and an opportunity to serve others. She uses her podcast the absence of her to share her life story, and the lessons she has learned as a way of helping others through their own dark times.

 

 

https://www.spreaker.com/user/theabsenceofher

https://www.facebook.com/IAmEverretMaxine

https://twitter.com/everretmaxine

https://www.instagram.com/iameverretmaxine

 

 

 

 

(This transcript is intended as a guide only. It may not be 100% correct.)

 

Emily Olsen 

Wherever there are shadows, there are people ready to kick out the darkness until it bleeds daylight. This is Bleeding Daylight with your host Rodney Olsen.

 

Rodney Olsen 

Everret Maxine’s story is one of heartache but it isn’t one of defeat. Everret is using the struggles and hurdles of her life to walk alongside others who are facing their own pain and hurt. Today we’ll hear how her life of loss has helped her to become an agent of healing.

 

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Everret Maxine Johnson has seen more than her fair share of heartache but she's now sharing the lessons that trauma and difficulty had taught her to help others. She believes that being a survivor carries responsibility and an opportunity to serve others. She uses her podcast the absence of her to share her life story, and the lessons she has learned as a way of helping others through their own dark times. It's my privilege to introduce you to her today, Everret, welcome to Bleeding Daylight.

 

Everret Maxine 

Good morning. Good morning.

 

Rodney Olsen 

Your story is one of loss in various ways and your first great loss began at a very young age, at just 10, help me understand what was happening for you at that time.

 

Everret Maxine 

Well, at 10, my mother and I were still living with my grandmother, my maternal grandmother, and her sister lived there as well. That was my great aunt. And me and my great aunt Lv, we were inseparable. She would create little games for me to play. And she was a lot older than I was when she passed, I think she was about 70. So she was like, it was like a 60 year difference, but we would play in the yard together, we would, we would just do all kinds of things together. And so when she passed, it was really hard for me. She went through two types of cancer and the last time she had, I believe it was a tumor in the stomach because she had two different things back to back and we had went to Astroworld, which was the theme park here in Texas. And I was having such a nice time. And I'm on a ride with my friend. And mind you I'm a 10 year old kid. And I look at my friend and it's not my friend. It's my aunt Lv sitting next to me, waving goodbye. I was just stunned, like what just happened. So I get back to my aunt Odessa's house. And we're there. And my uncle called to say that my great aunt surgery went fine. And he had left a message on the voicemail. And shortly after that, he called and said, she passed away. I beat my fist into the floor. I cried all night, I cried for days. Because here I was 10 years old, I didn't understand. And me and my friend had made her a welcome home sign. And I was so excited because I didn't understand death. You know, when you're a kid, you think everybody is immortal. And so that was really hard for me to understand.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So even before her passing, she was going through a very serious illness with the cancer. What was that like for you as a child, seeing someone that you loved going through that difficulty?

 

Everret Maxine 

Once she started going through, it was hard for me because she couldn't do the things that she used to do. And then she was relocated out of my grandmother's home to the nursing home, my mom worked back. Even though she was ill, I couldn't really tell other than her being in the nursing home until they had to shave her hair off for a surgery. And I believe that was the second surgery. And it was seeing her hair shaved off, her beautiful hair got gray hair gone. And she just didn't look like the same person. Now she looked like a sick woman. In my mind, I still thought that hey, this was my playmate, my great aunt, my friend, she was still going to recover from this.

 

Rodney Olsen 

I know it sounds like you're surrounded by family at this stage. There's your mother and Uncle another auntie. were they trying to explain to you what was happening at the time? Or do they feel you're a child? And we'll try and keep that away from you?

 

Everret Maxine 

You know, Rodney, nobody took the time to explain to me what was going on. I was an only child at the at the time and my mother always felt Well, she's intelligent, she understands. And I think people think when you're book smart, you understand all things and you don't like even kids that are really smart me life experiences explained to them,

 

Rodney Olsen 

I guess it must have been difficult for them at that time as well. Seeing a loved relative who's on the verge of passing away, but it would be difficult to not actually know what's going on until it happened. So how did you begin to find a way back from that? How did you begin to find healing?

 

Everret Maxine 

Well, I started attending church when after she passed away, there was a church around the corner, and I started going to the church at that time. My mom was not going to church with me. And I started participating in a youth group. And as a youth group, we had a youth matron who I'm still associated with now. And she was just like this great woman of God had all this positive energy. And I started being around other children my age because at that time, I had only been around my aunt really, I would go to school. But as far as like being around children my age I didn't spend much time with. So when I started going to church, I was learning about God and this awesome power of positive experience in this life and salvation and that was just like my source. Like, anytime they opened the church doors, even if it was the elders having a prayer service, I want it to be in the midst of that,

 

Rodney Olsen 

After this tragedy of losing your great art, you found something to hang on to. And it sounds like church was a great place of solace for you. But back at school, it wasn't all that easy, was it?

 

Everret Maxine 

No, it wasn't because my newfound love for Christ did not eliminate my reality. One thing about Christianity, and I had to learn that over the years, is that although believing in Christ gives us a positive hope, it doesn't mean you're not going to go through things. Like when you're a baby in Christ, should I say you think oh, well, I believe in Christ. So I'm not gonna go through anything. And at school, I was still kind of like an oddball. Like I say, my mom only birth one child. So I didn't really know how to fix my hair. And I didn't wear the latest trends. And I didn't really care too. That was my thing. I didn't have to feel like I needed to wear the latest trends. I just cared about bookwork. I like homework, I like test, I loved math class. And so the kids picked on me a lot.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So you're being picked on you're being bullied, I believe you're even skipping school at this stage. So something that you love you're trying to stay away from, because it's just too painful to be there. How did you reconcile those things of wanting to be there so much, and yet, knowing that, that's just going to bring extra pain for you?

 

Everret Maxine 

Well, I don't believe I just ever really reconciled it. I tolerated it. I never really learned how to do my school years defend myself. Due to junior high years, I would still go but I would go like half of the day, I would let up think my mother would think I've been to school all day, because she worked two jobs. So anything that was going on with me, it was putting me into a like a dark depression. I just really I didn't even you know, want to live or exist anymore. And one of the things that I talked about in the podcast is my attempts with suicide, and wanting to give up on life. I tried a number of times, but my relationship with God and knowing God, and knowing the basics of Heaven and Hell, even though I hated being on earth and felt like I was living in Hell, I was afraid that if I ended my life, I would end up in hell eternally. And so I kind of just feel like I was just stuck and had to pick up the pieces. Now once I got to me in high school, you think about college and things like that. And because my home life kind of wasn't, you know what everybody thought, I just figured, okay, if I buckled down, get the good grades, I can go off to college, and all of this life will be behind me. And well, it just didn't work out that way. But you know, I pushed through. I did graduate on time, I did graduate with honors as well.

 

Rodney Olsen 

And around the age of 16, your family life started to change to I believe.

 

Everret Maxine 

A whole lot things change. This is about in 1997 that my mother did get married. She got with him, I want to say in about 96. So during the time that my mother had got with her husband, I was a teenager, he had just been us for the most of our life. And so I was like, I'm not gonna live in this situation. I'll go live with my grandmother because we had moved out of my grandmother's house after my great aunt passed. I kept going back about I leave my mom's house, you know, I can't I can't do this. Because when she brought him into the picture, and I only speak about this because this was their past. They wants to deliver it from it. Call him my father. Now because he was there most of my life. He had a drug habit. She was still battling alcohol use. So that combined was just a toxic environment. At the point that my grandmother had accepted that hey, yeah, you know, maybe it'll be okay for you to come and stay. My grandmother passed away. So then they got married. My mom asked me what I attend a wedding and I told her No, I just couldn't. Because I believe if you attend a wedding and you sit Watch them exchange your vows. You agree to uphold those vows and support the marriage. And in my whole heart, I couldn't do that. I helped her get dressed for the wedding. You know, she wasn't beautiful that day, but I just could not attend.

 

Rodney Olsen 

That must have been a real struggle for you. Is there any time since then that you've regretted that or you still feel that that was the thing that you had to do in that moment,

 

Everret Maxine 

Even though they've both now passed on, I don't regret my decision. Because I knew that I couldn't support the marriage. I mean, I had my own wedding, I wouldn't want anybody whether they're blood or friend, to show up if they don't support.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So this is all still happening while you're still in your teenage years and these are the years that are the most formative years in our lives. And yet, it seems to be one trauma after another year, you've lost your great art, you've never lost your grandmother and and your mother is entering into a marriage that you you don't agree with? Again, where are you finding solace during this time? Where are you finding someplace to go to that is helping you through these difficulties,

 

Everret Maxine 

Our still crying out to God, because at this point, right about 16 was when I had stopped attending church, because when she got in the relationship, it was harder for me to go because it was like, I was radical for Christ, like I believed in Christ. And it was as if they were testing my faith, July of 1996, a couple of months before they got married, I had also been sexually assaulted, I had went to go stay with a friend from church and their family. And so nobody knew about it. And I waited about two months for I actually told anyone, but I kind of withdrew from the church, and the youth matron that I was close to we lost contact for some years. And so I just had to continue in my own faith. And with my own hope that once I graduated, I can just go to college and be free of the situation.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So you're holding this hurting side that you've not told anyone about what happens when you do graduate college? How does life start to turn at that point,

 

Everret Maxine 

Right before I graduate high school, I was accepted to several different colleges, Spelman College, and Georgia Liberty University in Virginia, just a number of colleges, but I was not allowed to travel outside the state. My parents didn't think that was the best choice. My mom had a hard time supporting my decision to go to college. She had gotten her GED at the age of 17, when she had her first marriage before I was born. And she had been a Nurse Aide for majority of her life. So she just kind of felt like, you know, why are you pursuing this college thing? Why can't you just get a job like normal people and save money because not many people in my family at that point had been to college. So my first semester I went off to Wharton junior college, and I enjoyed it. I still worked, but it none of my college experience was like, you know, get to go enjoy the clubs or the college experience. My first semester was spent at Wharton, and then I went to Baylor, which was highly expensive. So of course, on my own, I couldn't afford it. And I really couldn't afford to stay. So then I ended back at Wharton. From then there was some gaps for some years. Somewhere in there. I would do a couple of classes here and there. But I didn't get to really have a consistent college, career and experience.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So how did college continue for you? Did you manage to graduate? Where did you get to with your studies?

 

Everret Maxine 

Well, in January of 2005, I decided to pursue a degree in environmental health and safety after working in a couple of what we call shutdowns. After chemical plants. It's where they shut down the plant for maintenance. And so I would do like helper jobs or Firewatch jobs and fire watches just watch for fires I happen. I saw people being this job title call safety tech that paid really well. And so I went and got my associates degree in environmental health and safety. And I graduated with that in December 2007. Now seeking employment for that particular position really didn't work out in my favor. But I did end up continuing my bachelor's degree and I want to say I went back around oh eight and started on my bachelor's degree again. There was some delay. After I went back I started attending Texas Southern University. Originally my bachelor's degree was in communications and poly side because I wanted to be a attorney. And when I decided to continue it I said, Well, I want to do education, I had been a substitute part time here and there. And I really liked being in the classroom. So I'm happy to say, even though it took me several extra years, I just graduated with my Bachelors of education. With the content area of math and science grades four through eight, December 2020,

 

Rodney Olsen 

You finally got that graduation that you were looking for all those years, when we go back and look at those years where it was a struggle for you to have that college education and going between colleges, what was happening for you personally, what was happening in your personal life?

 

Everret Maxine 

Well, in 2008, I married my husband, my former husband, and we had been friends, since I was 12, the marriage was rather difficult, and I'll say on both ends, you know, Women liked to bash the men but we both had issues coming into the marriage. And so I thought that, you know, it was gonna just be this great relationship, because we had lived together before. And we had a lot of financial struggles. And so somewhere in there, he says, you know, me trying to pursue this degree was, you know, draining all our money, which really wasn't, again, I went through a relationship, just like with my mother of not having the support to pursue my degree, I put it on hold, I didn't think it would be five years because that was 2013, I decided not to pursue the degree anymore. And so when I went back to finish it, it was 2018, there was a lot of toxic discord between me and my former husband, that kind of just wore me out emotionally, because I already didn't have a good emotional foundation, and had already been through several traumas that I had not addressed that I didn't see as trauma. Because let me say this, I am from the black culture, and we don't advocate therapy and mental health awareness, and talking about your problems. We advocate, you know, pray about it, and it'll go away, or, you know, you know, don't tell anybody your secrets. And so I had literally buried a lot of that stuff in me. I've come to learn, though, when you bury that stuff it's still taking root in your life. And so I stayed in the marriage for 10 years, we were together almost 20. Before I finally said, I had had enough that it was time to let it go. From January of 2017. Until the end of last year, I was in therapy, learning whoever it is, it was quite an experience. Now I know how much damage not only that I was doing to myself, but also to him for going into a marriage and having unhealed wounds.

 

Rodney Olsen 

I've spoken to a number of people about the fact that so often we don't actually know what is normal when we're in a situation that is so outside what we would see as normal. We don't see it as such, because it's all we know was that a bit of the case for you that really, as far as marriage and relationships went you hadn't had that modeled and so you were just doing what you thought you should do

 

Everret Maxine 

With my parents, their marriage, even though they were close knit, they were always together. Like when they'd have arguments yelling and screaming was normal. When me and my former husband would get into it, yelling and screaming was normal, me throwing something in breaking something was normal, saying degrading things to each other, you know, to tear each other down. That was my normal. And so I didn't see anything wrong with that. People reproduce what they see.

 

Rodney Olsen 

And you had that difficulty of all these traumas backing up, and then just trying to act in the best way that you knew how you've already mentioned that you went into therapy. Did that start to turn the lights on for you to start to realize, aha, there is a different way of dealing with some of this drama?

 

Everret Maxine 

Oh, absolutely. There'll be took me to places I had never experienced it was nothing like I thought it would be it was with a Christian therapist. So I thought, Oh, she's going to tell them about Jesus loves you, blah, blah, throw some scriptures at me, and I'm not going to feel any type of way. But our first session was she dug into the sexual assault. That to me, you know, I just met this person, I don't know this person. And I'm like, Oh, that's what she wants to talk about. And it took me about three months before I began actually trusting her enough to open up and it was like layers were coming off. Because I learned that the mother is the foundation. And so because our relationship wasn't solid, and then we She got married, it was like, okay, I've never felt like I was first in your life. And then now here you are, you've married somebody and made him first. I don't have anybody. So then I get married, thinking this person is supposed to put me first. And when I felt like it was some disconnect, or he was putting me first, I just completely lost it. And sometimes it wasn't even the case. But I had all those insecurities that I didn't feel like I was somebodies priority.

 

Rodney Olsen 

So this whole time, there's this insecurity built right through your, your childhood. And again, that that teaching or that prevailing culture that says, We don't talk about our issues, we just stuffed them down. How was faith for you at this stage? Was that something you were still able to cling on to? Were you still able to reach out to God during this time? Or was this a time apart from him?

 

Everret Maxine 

In the marriage, we had stopped attending church after about the first five years into the marriage, there was some issues going on at the church we were at. So we had stopped going. In our own minds, we kind of just felt like we were okay. We would, you know, go gambling, we had loss of employment. We were kind of just as people say, doing me just living our own life. Now, as far as the miracles that God could do. I was believing he could turn things around. Because I believe it was about in 2004 that my mother who I said had the alcohol addiction. She collapsed at home and had been sick for some while but we thought it just was a regular chest call. And she collapsed and was life flighted, and was in the hospital for a month. For the first week in the hospital, she was comatose, the doctors didn't believe she was survive. And on the eighth day, she woke up and she gave me a call. She was in a state of paralysis. She had to learn to walk again. But her desire to drink and smoke she no longer had in my adulthood, I had a better relationship with her. And I had a better view of how God could change things. So my hope that God could change things was still there. But my desire to go to church to seek His word was not

 

Rodney Olsen 

What changed that for you. Because I know that you very much cling to God now what turned you around to face him and cling more tightly to him

 

Everret Maxine 

in 2014, my aunt Amanda, one of my mom's sisters, she suddenly passed away, out of nowhere in March of 2014. And I was at work when that happened. Fast forward to July of 2014, my father then passed my mom's husband going through that, it was just like, golly, these people were gone. And I need to do something to get myself in alignment with God. Because all my father asked for during his final days was his Bible. 2016, I lose another off. And in that same year was the year me and my husband separated. I had kind of felt like a huge disconnect from him. And it was it just seems like we were going in the same circles, no progress. And so I had started 2016, a lady that I was very close to Miss Mary Jane. She was in her 80s when she passed away. And her and I were good friends. She was also my us matron Teresa's mother. So we reconnected after about 15 years later. So I spent a lot of time at her home. And so I had time to separate myself from the things that were going on in my household. And I could see that this isn't good. And so she invited me to church. And so for a little while I didn't you know, accept the invitation. And then I finally started going. And as I started going and getting the word me again, and hearing the pastor preach, it felt like she was preaching to my situations. And one of the things that she said was that God changes people, you're going to wear yourself out trying to force people to change. My former husband had told me a number of things that he didn't want, he didn't care to do. And it was like I was still trying to force him to change and trying to force him to change. I was forcing myself to be unhappy. And so I finally got to a place in my life where when he walked out in my of my life in 2016 I was like this is gonna be the last time Because he had walked out in my life before, and I would beg him back or I would want the marriage to work, being a believer in Christ, and caring too much about what other people thought I would keep getting back in this marriage because I didn't want to fail. And I was afraid to fail, no matter how much damage it did to me emotionally.

 

Rodney Olsen 

And I know that as you came closer to God, that that was maybe preparing you for some more difficulties that were coming your way and losing someone very close to you.

 

Everret Maxine 

I gave it a couple of years, because I don't believe in immediately running to divorce. Two years down the road, I'm now establishing myself to be an adult on my own, because I had never lived on my own. In 2018 May 28, my grandmother, Roxy, she took her final breath. And it was the five year anniversary of her brothers passing. And my grandma, Roxy was my grandma by marriage, but she was still my grandma. We went to her bedside. And at her bedside, my mom was talking about when she had an asthma attack at work. And so me and my my brother, like you didn't mention that. And so she says, Oh, I don't tell y'all everything. And for some reason, it hit me in my gut that if my mother ever passed away, that would be what happened to her. So on that day, before we went to go see my grandmother at the nursing home, I tell my mom about the therapy, because here I've been in therapy over a year now. And I've never mentioned it to her because I didn't know what her take of it was going to be. And when I told her about the therapy, she said, I'm so glad you have somebody to talk to the Sunday, June 17. It was Father's Day. And I had a video that I was going to show my mom sent to my mom that I had of her standing at her husband's bedside during his final moments. But I said, If she's not thinking about him, I'm not going to upset her. And so late that night, it was about 11 o'clock till 11 o'clock that night. I just had this urge to go and be my mom. I'm crying, carrying on. And now I've moved out of town an hour and a half away. So I drive back home. I parked in the driveway. And I told my friend Theresa, I said, I'm going to sit here because I don't know why. But I'm crying for my mom. But sitting in their driveway was a little creepy. So I drove up to some family's property and just sat there. And then I drove home. Once my spirit got calm, I drove home, and I prayed. And I was praying over myself. For no thoughts of depression, no thoughts of suicide, just and I'm like, why am I praying like this? Well, Tuesday morning, I got a phone call as I'm going into therapy. It was my mom's job. And they said, Everret, please go check on your mother. She hasn't been to work. She had sounded bad when she left work that Friday. That Saturday, she had called them and told them she wasn't coming in. She was sick. And I will assume she was off that Sunday and Monday. And so Tuesday when she didn't show. They knew something wasn't right. My mother never calls in sick from work. She's never no call no show. So even before anybody told me anything, I knew she was already deceased. So I didn't call the authorities. And I didn't know that the person who had called me which was an in law at the time, she had also called my husband. And he cause him and my mom so had a decent relationship. And he had called one of my cousins and they had kicked in the door. Well, nobody wanted to tell me over the phone. So when I got to town I called and I asked is she gone. Nobody wants to tell me and I said I'm okay because I already feel that she's gone. And she had been she was sitting on the couch. She had been gone a couple of days. So I really feel like that Sunday, when I pulled up and was crying her spirit was already leaving. And that was a transforming moment for me for my life. And that is where my podcast came from. The Absence of Her.

 

Rodney Olsen 

The podcast seeks to call out things in other people when they're going through dark times. And I suppose not everyone is going to have a story that is just like yours, but people will see themselves in some of those dark times. And I know that one of the things that called you to actually start reaching out and helping others with the help that God was pouring into you was a very odd dream.

 

Everret Maxine 

I have a lot of visions, but I had this dream where I was, I didn't have any clothes on. And God said naked but not ashamed. Here, I was going through the separation going through this very public time in my marriage. My grandmother had passed, my mom had passed. And people are saying, Oh, you're so strong, you're so strong, you know. And I felt like you're I am presenting this lot of people because I go through things as well. And so in him saying naked, but not ashamed, was for me to uncover the things that I had been through. And don't be ashamed of your life experiences. But share them so that other people know that, hey, somebody went through this and survived, because the same year that my mother passed away, she passed away in June, I filed divorce shortly after it was final November 5, of 2018. And so a lot of people were in shock, because they thought the marriage was so good, I thought things are so good between us. And so that's what I just been began pouring out my life experiences and things that I had been through. And I love that God used me as that vessel, because I've had responses from mainly women of things that they have been through that they've never spoke about and they're happy that I've shared, because now they know that, hey, I'm not the only one that went through this.

 

Rodney Olsen 

You mentioned before that it's very much a cultural thing for you to hide the things that are going on inside. So are you finding that those who are responding are people from your own culture in that way, who have been brought up in that same way to be told you don't go to therapy, you don't tell people what you're going through, you just stuffed inside?

 

Everret Maxine 

Yes, there are a lot majority of them are from the black culture, they are open to sharing with me, so I pray for them. And I tell God, you know, use me wisely. And I share with about my mental health experience. Um, and I share about the therapy and the benefits of it. You can't force anybody to do anything. But if you know somebody that has gone through it, you're more likely to try it and say, Hey, I see that turn that person's life around. That's just like with, you know, being a Christian, everybody's not gonna run to the church, but they were gonna look at your life and say, you know, is it doing is a relationship Christ doing something for them.

 

Rodney Olsen 

And that's the point that you're bringing people to, obviously with the podcast has had quite a number of episodes already, as you start to unpack the things that you've been through. And I'm sure that it's not just helpful for the people that are listening and who are getting in touch. But it must be really helpful for you to be able to unpack a lot of that in front of your audience.

 

Everret Maxine 

It is a very healing experience. For me, I was told at the age of 16, that I would be standing before the people talking to the people and I had not even been halfway through what I've been through now. And so now I'm at the ripe age of 40. Last year with the podcast, I began doing Her Fridays, allowing other women to share their life experiences with others. I pray about every episode is not just me rambling out at the mouth about you know, my life or something that is going on. But I want it to be a purposeful message. And so it is very healing for me to talk about what I've been through those those God moments that hey, you some five minutes like you kick life in the tail, kiddo. So hey, yeah,

 

Rodney Olsen 

And of course, with all the trauma that you've been through over those many years in various ways, we will be foolish to think that you're completely over everything now. But you're actually still going on that journey. And it must be a real benefit. For those who are listening in to know that, hey, we're on this journey together. It's not some unrealistic expectation that suddenly it's all going to fall into place, but that we can walk this journey together, but you and your listeners are together, walking towards healing towards hope,

 

Everret Maxine 

Even the women that I interview, I still try to reach out and see how they're doing. Because every day is just because I am in a place of trying to heal does not mean that my life is perfect at this point. Grief is a process, but we don't have to stay in a state of depression and state of mourning. Because that person is not here. There is purpose for your pain. That's what I tell myself. I mean, I just had a cry the other day because I missed my mom. It's a process you know, but you you get up and you find some positive things to do. You you write you exercise You realize that I am not going through this alone. And that is, you know what I want all people that believe all motherless daughters that you're not going through this alone,

 

Rodney Olsen 

Your podcast is called the Absence of Her. It's going to be very healing for a lot of people. I'm sure. If people are wanting to find that or get in touch with you, where's the easiest place for them to go?

 

Everret Maxine 

I have an Instagram which is at iamEverretmaxine. That's the same title on my Facebook page. And the podcast is located on just about any outlet, Google podcast, Spotify, I Heart Radio, Pandora. So if you just type in the Absence of Her, or if you do the hashtag, I am Everret Maxine. You can also find me

 

Rodney Olsen 

And we'll certainly put the details and links of how to get in touch with you in the show notes at bleeding daylight dotnet. But now people have a direct link to get in touch with you. Ever. This has been an extraordinary story that you've been telling him. And I want to thank you for your honesty and your openness in sharing this story with us. And I know that this is not the end of the story, but I know that it's going in the right direction. And I just want to say once again, thank you so much for your time with us on bleeding daylight today.

 

Everret Maxine 

Thank you for the opportunity to share.

 

Emily Olsen 

Thank you for listening to Bleeding Daylight. Please help us to shine more light into the darkness by sharing this episode with others. For further details and more episodes, please visit bleedingdaylight.net

 

 
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